BuSpar

BuSpar is a medicine that treats anxiety and anxiety-related disorders. It also helps to ease anxiety symptoms such as a rapid heartbeat, tense muscles, dizziness and lightheadedness. It accomplishes these things by balancing chemicals in the brain that are unbalanced. BuSpar is generally a short-term medication; most patients take it for no longer than four weeks.

You will have to take some cautions when you’re on BuSpar. For example, you’ll want to be especially careful when you drive or perform any activities that require full concentration in order to be safe, as BuSpar can cause drowsiness, can slow down your reaction time, and can even impair your thinking from time to time. And do not eat grapefruit or drink grapefruit juice while you are taking BuSpar, as this mixture can create harmful reactions. You should also give up alcohol for the period of time when you’re on BuSpar.

You won’t be able to take BuSpar if you have a buspirone allergy, or if you’ve taken an MAO inhibitor drug in the past fourteen drugs. You need to be certain this MAO inhibitor has fully cleared out of your system, or else the combination of BuSpar and this MAO inhibitor could result in harmful, and even lethal, reactions. Also be sure to tell your doctor if you are allergic to any drugs before you accept a prescription for BuSpar. And certain patients may not be able to take this medication, a group which might include those who have suffered from liver or kidney disease. Your doctor will probably disallow you from taking BuSpar while breastfeeding, but as there’s no evidence that BuSpar can do any harm to a fetus, you may be able to take this drug while you are pregnant. It’s possible if you take other forms of medications at the same time you’re on BuSpar – medications such as cold medicines, allergy medicines, sleeping pills, seizure medications and muscle relaxers – that they can mix with the BuSpar and make you especially drowsy. You may even feel as though you want to fall asleep almost all the time. For that reason, you should consult with your doctor if you are on such medications. You can take BuSpar with food if you choose to, or without. However, if you start taking BuSpar with food you should keep on doing so; likewise, if you start taking it without food you should keep on doing that as well. (Sometimes it’s easier to remember to take medication if you take it with food at mealtimes.) If you take BuSpar tablets, you may find that you’re required to break these tablets before swallowing. There will be marks on the tablets indicating exactly which points at which you should break them. If you don’t break it the right way, however, just throw that tablet away and get another one. You don’t want to take a dosage that’s too large or not large enough.

Also note that some doctors will switch patients from one anti-anxiety medication to BuSpar. If this is the case for you, you might be required to take decreasing dosages of your old medication even after you start taking BuSpar. The reason for this is that if you suddenly drop your old medication when you start taking BuSpar, you may suffer strong physical withdrawal pains.

The following side effects of BuSpar are highly unusual, and should you experience them you will need to get medical help as fast as possible: rapid heart rate, fainting spells, or inability to coordinate your muscles. Likewise, get medical help immediately should you show any signs of being allergic to BuSpar, including hives or a swollen face or tongue.

 
Online Prescriptions Online Prescriptions